The Golden Ratio
Intersecting the Natural and Built Environments
(IM)POSSIBLE CHICAGO #19
“At night when you’re out driving, you know which neighborhood you’re in by the light of the streetlamps, as each ward basks in their own different hue. For instance, if the streets are all aglow in azurite, you’re definitely joy riding around Marquette Park.
Zoning codes require that windows are tinted according to the neighborhood’s chromatic identity, so no matter how the interiors are lighted, houses, skyscrapers and 7-Elevens do not give off wayward wavelengths.Even your car lights beam out the same color. But when you cross over into another ward, they instantaneously switch filter to match that ward’s assigned spectrum.”
  1. (IM)POSSIBLE CHICAGO #19

    At night when you’re out driving, you know which neighborhood you’re in by the light of the streetlamps, as each ward basks in their own different hue. For instance, if the streets are all aglow in azurite, you’re definitely joy riding around Marquette Park.


    Zoning codes require that windows are tinted according to the neighborhood’s chromatic identity, so no matter how the interiors are lighted, houses, skyscrapers and 7-Elevens do not give off wayward wavelengths.

    Even your car lights beam out the same color. But when you cross over into another ward, they instantaneously switch filter to match that ward’s assigned spectrum.”

  1. 31 notesTimestamp: Thursday 2011/08/25 23:31:35(im)possiblechicagoprunedtintedzoningcodesstreetlamp
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